Mindset, Motivation and Leadership


  1. A new longitudinal study on leadership development strongly
    suggests that making sure our students have a growth mindset and are encouraged
    to take on a challenge and  pursue it
    until they achieve mastery, is one of the most important things parents and
    educators can do.  I would argue that it can
    also go a long way towards ensuring that students at our college are retained
    and successful in their academic goals.

    This study was the subject of the latest Harvard Education Letter. The
    study looks at how leadership qualities develop, and what determines if a child
    will or won’t become a leader later in life.  One of the most important roles education plays
    is to prepare students to become leaders, so this study is extremely important
    to anyone involved in the educational process.

    The study finds that, surprisingly, children as young as two
    display traits that can predict leadership later in life. Here are some of the
    key traits exhibited by children that can predict if they are likely to become
    leaders as adults:

    .

    ·
    Openness: How a child responds to a
    novel situation—like a person, place, toy, or food is very important, with
    those children open to new situations and things much more likely to become leaders.

    ·
    Demanding: Children who placed the
    most demands on teachers and parents to join or do activities, and commitment
    to the new activity.

    ·
    External Encouragement:
    Whether or not those around the child supported the child’s interests and novel
    activities was just as important at predicting leadership as the child’s
    internal temperament.

    ·
    Growth Mindset: motivation to take on a
    challenge and pursue it until they find mastery or success.

    These last two points are vital for parents and educators to
    remember. From the article:

    Equally important was the parent’s support in fostering
    new passions and interests, [the researcher] says, noting that the same issue
    arises in classrooms between students and teachers.
    “It doesn’t mean
    you say yes to everything the kid wants,” …But if a child “shows a genuine
    interest” in something, that support can be essential to fostering a key
    leadership quality—the drive to take on a challenge and pursue it until they
    find mastery or success.

    That a Growth Mindset was identified in everyday leaders is
    not surprising because,   “when you are a leader you have to delve into a
    world that is uncharted,” and those likely to become leaders enjoyed this process
    and did not view it as a chore.

     

    Similar
    to other studies this new study showed that while a high IQ was slightly
    related to leadership development,  “ …the
    data showed that stronger motivation trumped higher IQ’s,” when it came to
    leadership development.

     

    The
    article also includes Carol Dweck’s take on the new study.  Dweck along with other researchers argue that
    schools that  “ …place such heavy
    emphasis on extrinsic rewards like test scores and classroom prizes that they
    risk stifling development of students’ inner drive.”

     

    Something
    to think about as we try to devise ways to increase retention and success for students.


    Daniel McCrea

     

    Link to article:

    http://www.hepg.org/hel/article/524#home

  2. Share
    Outstanding research article from HGSE, based on a longitudinal study, highlights the most important qualities in cultivating and determining leadership in youth, as well as implications for K12 pedagogical practices. A Must Read!
    Thu, Feb 02 2012 15:36:41
  3. Share
    How leadership develops in children: Harvard Education Letter: hepg.org/hel/article/524#home via @AddThis
    Thu, Feb 02 2012 13:35:54
  4. Share
    Key factors in leadership development. Let’s encourage these attributes. Harvard Education Letter: hepg.org/hel/article/524#home via @AddThis
    Thu, Feb 02 2012 15:47:49
  5. Share
    Students’ behavior can predict future leadership ability sbne.ws/r/9WPb
    via @harvard education letter @edweek
    Fri, Feb 03 2012 15:54:43
  6. Share
    Fostering the leadership potential of our students; and moving away from rewards:Harvard Education Letter: hepg.org/hel/article/524#home via @AddThis
    Sun, Feb 05 2012 04:29:06
  7. Share
    Teachers can encourage leadership development in students: Research: Harvard Education Letter: hepg.org/hel/article/524#home
    Sun, Feb 05 2012 21:28:04

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